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Posted on 13 December 2010 by urbangardencasual.com

Welcoming Spring with Green Onions

green_onionBy Mindy McIntosh-Shetter

I have always associated the start of spring not by what is on the calendar but what I plant in the garden.

The planting of fresh spinach, and Bibb lettuce along with green onions has always marked the start of spring on my planting calendar.

But planting the first spring bed requires some tricks of the trade.

Green Onions

These beauties are easy to grow and are a vegetable to start with if you are a beginning vegetable gardener. I have never planted green onions in any area they did not grow.

A loamy soil mixed with compost is perfect. They can also be planted in containers but regardless of where you plant them there does exist a trick of the trade.

This trick goes against Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 21 April 2010 by urbangardencasual.com

Vegetables to Start from Seed

basil2By Sonya Welter

The easiest way to start your garden is with transplants from a nursery, and for some plants this makes sense.

Here in Duluth, Minnesota, and in other cooler climates, the growing season simply isn’t long enough to grow hot weather crops like tomatoes or peppers from seed outdoors, and if you want to grow these vegetables at all, you’ll need to start seeds indoors several weeks from the last predicted frost.

Transplants cost more than seeds, but that way someone else does all the hard work of adjusting grow lights and fussing over humidity levels.

But there are some vegetables that, no matter where you live, should always be started from seed, because they grow quickly or don’t like their roots to be disturbed. It’s also a lot of fun to start some vegetables from seed, because that way you get to go out to your garden every day hoping to see little green leaves poking out through the dirt and reaching for the sky.

Radishes
Radishes are the sprinters of the Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 16 May 2009 by urbangardencasual.com

Make a Salad Table or Box

salad-tableBy Vanessa Richins

Are you trying to grow your own salad but don’t have much soil to work with?

If you have a paved space that is 3′ x 5′, you can build your own salad table and still be able to enjoy fresh greens.

The table was created by Jon Traunfeld from the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.

Their website gives detailed instructions for building a salad table. They also suggest several ways you can modify it for different crops – using wider boards to grow beans and peppers, for example.

There are other benefits to building a salad table. Those with problems kneeling won’t have to bend over much, since the table is 4′ high. Since the plants are up off the ground, it’s much less likely that they will be Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 11 September 2008 by urbangardencasual.com

Veggies One Step At a Time

By Cindy Naas

Recently, I’ve been traveling a fair amount, and the first thing I always want to do is to look at local gardens.

I’ve seen a lot of vegetables showing up in fairly traditional landscapes.

While these people who add a lettuce border to a floral border may not be ready to cut down the roses and grow chard instead, they are slowly adding more food crops to their home landscapes, and that’s good.

Corn is becoming a popular accent plant. Recently, I saw a beautiful garden of cutting flowers grown against a background of tall green corn. It was a beautiful garden, and the corn was Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 20 August 2008 by urbangardencasual.com

Urban Garden Act Two – The Fall Season

By Cindy Naas

We’re more than halfway through the summer, sad as that is to say.

That means, though, that it’s time to start thinking about fall crops to be started soon.

The first round of lettuces are probably turning bitter, the spinach is a happy memory- but for the clever gardener, those veggies and more will get a replay by starting soon.

  • Lettuce: After the lettuce starts tasting bitter or hot or turns tough, it’s time to let it go. Dig out the plant and compost. Now, you can direct seed a heat tolerant variety. Or, you can start lettuce seeds in a shady corner of your garden. Pot them into small peat pots, newspaper cones or just seedling trays, and you’ll have the new lettuce plants ready to be popped into the ground in mid-August.
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