cats « Tag

Posted on 03 April 2013 by urbangardencasual.com

Cats in the Garden: Shew Cat Shew

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Photo Credit: Garden helper by play4smee used under CC BY-NC 2.0

Photo Credit: Garden helper by play4smee used under CC BY-NC 2.0

By Mindy McIntosh-Shetter

When I was a child, cats in the garden were never really a problem.

My dogs normally chased them up to the barn and that was that.

Once I got married and moved to the urban jungle, I quickly learned about a horror tale called the “Black Cat and the Garden.”

While I am not superstitious and did own two black cats at the time, I did have a problem with this one black cat. My neighbors had associated the sight of the black cat and bad luck, especially in the garden.

I knew this was not true and instead tried to teach them the true reason for their plants dying. It was not black magic or bad luck but instead a cat’s need to go to the bathroom.

At this point, you may wonder, as my Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 01 March 2013 by urbangardencasual.com

Simple Ways of Protecting Your Garden from Pest the Organic Way

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Photo Credit: Cat in the garden by Alex Balan used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Photo Credit: Cat in the garden by Alex Balan used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

By Mindy McIntosh-Shetter

Pests can come in many different forms and can appear at different times of the season.

Some pests are easy to control or eliminate from that part of the garden while others can be more challenging.

The key to organically controlling a pest is a three-fold process.

The first stage is prevention, which is followed by knowing one’s pest and finally coming up with a management plan.

Prevention is an important stage when it comes to pest control. This can range from planting plants that are not susceptible to certain pest, such as nematodes and removing plant material from the garden space at the end of the season.

The next stage is Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 11 April 2010 by urbangardencasual.com

Grow Your Own Wheatgrass

wheatgrassBy Sonya Welter

Some people grow their own wheat grass to juice for smoothies.

It’s so loaded with vitamins, minerals, enzymes and chlorophyll that it’s referred to as a superfood, capable strengthening the immune system and battling any number of ailments.

But I grow wheat grass for a much more important reason. I grow wheat grass for my cats.

Growing your own wheatgrass is much cheaper than the cutesy grow-you-own-cat-grass packets sold in pet stores or the trays of fresh wheatgrass in the produce department of fancy grocery stores. Wheat grass is sprouted wheat berries (which can also be ground to make wheat flour).

Almost any Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 02 August 2009 by urbangardencasual.com

Cats and Houseplants

cats-and-houseplantsBy Vanessa Richins

I recently moved into a new apartment and discovered that one of my roommates owned a cat.

One of the cat’s newest hobbies is to jump up on the table where my houseplants are to investigate.

She’s even managed to start chewing on them.

My poor snake plant has a chunk taken out of one spike, and I think the pothos, schefflera and ficus are also under possible attack.

As much as I think cats are nice, I’d also like to have nice, healthy plants. I recently asked for suggestions from my beloved Twitter friends.

Bitter apple or pepper spray:

Several people suggested that I spray the plants with a bitter apple or pepper solution. These tastes horrible and deters the cat from chewing. You can buy bitter apple spray at pet stores. As for pepper spray, you could simply add some Tabasco to some water and spray on your plants.

Aluminum Foil:

Someone suggested that you could Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 16 August 2008 by urbangardencasual.com

This Week in Urban Gardens

By Reggie Solomon

  • Julie Ann at Jewells in Seattle laments this year’s cool season which is impacting her tomatoes.
  • Moonwolf at Guerrilla Gardeners: Now Public captures photos of sunflowers growing under a city sidewalk grate proving gardening can happen in the unlikeliest of places.
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