Posted on 05 April 2013 by urbangardencasual.com

Need Plants to Plant, Have Plants to Give – Try PlantCatching

Photo Credit: Baby Broccoli by mcav0y used under CC BY-NC 2.0

Photo Credit: Baby Broccoli by mcav0y used under CC BY-NC 2.0

By Mindy McIntosh-Shetter

Last spring, my dad had a bumper crop of Lilies of the Valley.

While I know it is not a vegetable, the concept of this story applies.

Well, I asked my dad what he was going to do with all these lilies.

He responded I am just going to pull them up and compost them.

I know composting is a great thing and the excess plant material did not end up in the trash but I wondered if there was a better way. I mentioned this to a gardening friend of mine and he said I have the answer. This was PlantCatching.

PlantCatching is a unique concept where excess plants and garden supplies find new homes with local gardeners. How this program works is simple. First, you decide what to give. Keep in mind that you can give more than plants. Some ideas include pots, soil, compost, seeds, plant labels, and a course plants.

After you have decided what you want to give, the next step is to decide how you want to give it. PlantCatching has three ways you can give. One way is the public mode, which simply requires a gardener to place a plant outside their home for anyone to take. The second way is referred to as semi-private. How this works is PlantCatching is contacted and your plant donation is located on their donation map.

The garden material remains in your home or yard until another gardener desires your material. Once this is noted, instructions are given from the giver on how to retrieve the material. The last way is called private donation. This work very similar to the semi-private but instead you find your plant on the map and contact the gardener directly. Once this is done, you can go meet the plant’s parent and pick up your plant.

How you utilize PlantCatching is up to you but it is a great way of meeting new gardeners and reestablishing with your gardening community. To encourage this movement, do not forget to add the PlantCatching label to your donating items. This will get the message out while spreading “green goodwill.”

I will have to tell you I love this idea and plan to participate this year. Let’s give PlantCatching a try. Share with me your experience in using PlantCatching and together we can make the world a better place one “green donation” at a time.

Until we blog again, as Kermit the Frog says, “It’s not easy being green” but PlantCatching can make it be.

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