Posted on 26 August 2008 by urbangardencasual.com

Garden Friends Part 1: Attracting Hummingbirds

By Vanessa Richins

My favorite birds are hummingbirds.

These tiny, vibrant creatures can bring a smile in an instant.

I love their natural curiosity and how they are able to appear motionless. Besides a hummingbird feeder, there are many plants that will attract them. Here are a few of my favorites.

1) Sunset Hyssop (Agastache rupestris)

All of the hyssops that have pink or orange flowers attract hummingbirds, but my favorite is Sunset hyssop. These flowers are a brilliant mixture of orange, purple and pink. When I worked at a water conservation garden, I loved pruning by this plant. The hummingbirds were always nearby, sparring. Sometimes they would zip right near my head to see what I was doing. This plant has a splendid scent – described as licorice or root beer. Once it is established, it is drought resistant

2) Hummingbird Trumpet (Zauschneria spp)

These trumpet-shaped flowers come in shades of red or orange. They also have the advantage of being drought resistant.

3) Azaleas

When I was growing up, my grandma had a really pretty azalea tree that I loved to see. It was trained as a double standard (2 balls on a stem) and was a brilliant magenta shade. One of the perfect colors to attract hummingbirds!

4) Gladiolus

These pretty flowers come from corms (similar to bulbs) and come in a dazzling array of colors. An added bonus is that it will produce additional corms on the plant each year, so you can dig them up, divide them, and plant even more gladiolus the next year.

These are 4 of my favorite hummingbird attractants.

What plants would you recommend?

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5 Responses to “Garden Friends Part 1: Attracting Hummingbirds”

  1. urbangardencasual.com Shibaguyz Says:

    Scarlet runner pole beans attracted our hummingbirds last year like crazy! Then we ate ’em… the beans… not the birds…

  2. urbangardencasual.com Mother Nature's Garden Says:

    Hummingbirds like cleome, four o’clocks, calibrachoa, honeysuckle, cypress vine, and petunia. These are only a few.

  3. urbangardencasual.com Zoe Ann Hinds Says:

    I would recommend the following plants:petunia, annual red salvia, autumn sage and shrimp plants, or the firebush. Also Lantana and Trumpet Creeper.

    Growing up, we always had many the plants listed above in our yard. My mom loved to attract hummingbirds through plants as well through the use of feeders. The use of plants will help beautify your yard and have the added bonus of attracting the hummingbirds.

    I have been learning about and developing articles on the subject of hummingbirds for athe past year or or so. I opperate two websites on the subject of hummingbirds. If you would like much more information about hummingbirds, please click the links below. The sites contain many articles about hummingbirds, video clips about hummingbirds, an informative tips booklet on hummingbirds, and much more.

    Click Here To Visit About Hummingbirds

    Hummingbirds For Mom

  4. urbangardencasual.com Cindy Says:

    ROFL at shibaguyz! I’m so glad the beans were eaten and not the birds. Thanks for my morning laugh!

    Mother Nature, I saw hummingbirds in my petunias just last week, much to the amazement of my indoor cats.
    🙂

  5. urbangardencasual.com Zoe Ann Hinds Says:

    Did you know that the Scarlet Runner Bean is considered to be both a plant and a vegetable? Well, that is true.

    The Scarlet Runner Bean originated in Central America. It was first grown in sixteenth-century Europe as an ornamental vine. The Scarlet Runner Bean was introduced in the United Sates in the early 1800’s. It was not until later in that century that the Scarlet Runner Bean began being used for culinary purposes. Many people today consider this bean a gourmet vegetable.

    Hope you enjoy this information. It is just some information that I thought you and your readers might not know.

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